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Legal Custody vs. Physical Custody

Many people in Colorado think of “custody” as having physical control of something. However, custody also involves other types of control and authority. When it comes to custody of a child, the law divides custody into two types: physical custody and legal custody. Courts generally allocate these forms of custody separately, so it is important for parents to understand the difference. What is Legal Custody in Colorado? When a parent has legal custody, they have …

Can I Stop Paying Child Support if My Ex Won’t Let Me See My Kids?

When a parent keeps their children from the other during court-ordered parenting time, it is common to have questions regarding child support, such as can you stop paying child support if your ex won’t let you see your children? Don’t Stop Paying Child Support! While stopping child support is a natural response to losing parenting time, it is not legal to do so. Parenting time and child support are separate issues that are handled independently …

Are Child Custody Orders Permanent in Colorado?

Generally, child custody orders are issued in legal separations, divorce actions, and paternity actions. What many parents don’t realize at first is that the family courts see child custody orders as open-ended. Meaning, they are subject to change. There are many valid reasons why a child custody order may need to be changed. Often, child custody orders are modified because the child’s needs or activities change, because of a job change, a new spouse, a relocation, an illness or a disability. Sometimes, …


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Our team includes attorneys licensed to practice in multiple states including April D. Jones in California, Patrick G. Barkman in Texas, the Cherokee Nation, the Northern District of Texas, and the District of Colorado (United States Court of Appeals 10th and 5th Circuit).